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Two Revit tools that significantly improve your workflow

Posted on by Nayive Kalkach

As someone that spends 80% of my working hours using Revit, I have taken on the task of finding tools that help ease repetitive processes and visualization when navigating a 3D model.

 The following add-ins have arisen as my two favorites and most used :

Coins Auto-Section box

Add-on that helps you to visualize in 3D a specific element or view. It is especially helpful when you are working on a larger project and want to avoid the usual "3D view/ Orient to view/Floor plan /Scroll forever to find the view name" route. Instead, just click on your element, type the previously set shortcut to run the tool and voila! your 3D view with a section box appears.

Stair plan
COINS Auto-Section Box
Palladio.PNG

Palladio helps you organize the layout of your windows with a few clicks (or key shortcuts) to your preferred size and location. The add-in lets you easily layout a right, left, top or bottom preference and a size for your windows, making it faster than manually resizing them.

Layout.PNG

Give them a try and let me know how they worked out for you, I am sure you won't be disappointed.

Oh! Did I mention they are free?

 

 

MUJI IS ENOUGH.

Posted on by Nayive Kalkach

MUJI celebrated the opening of a new store in Palo Alto by bringing one of the top known industrial designers to give a talk in San Francisco. 

Naoto Fukasawa gave a compelling, simple and clear presentation. His interest in simplicity wasn't only shown in his materials, but also in his every move and word. Using Design Thinking as the core of his design process, he invited us to understand the importance of achieving balance in design.

Mental stability, authenticity in everyday life and discovery were some of the keywords that lead the presentation. He walked us through the importance for MUJI to stay in the backgroundand to create things of everyday use that are so simple in use, material, function and size that feel JUST RIGHT.He also highlighted the importance of giving value and a different perspective to the things that already exist. 

The profession of product design can push you to create things just for the sake of creating. Analyzing critically the uncomplicated products created by Naoto Fukasawa for  MUJI has changed they way I look at everyday objects.

Tim Brown, CEO of consulting firm IDEO giving the introductory opening.

Tim Brown, CEO of consulting firm IDEO giving the introductory opening.

Naoto Fukasawa

Naoto Fukasawa

My lovely companions.

My lovely companions.

This has nothing to do with the event but it was in the venue and I loved the use of light for the sign.

This has nothing to do with the event but it was in the venue and I loved the use of light for the sign.

 

Some of Naoto's design products for the world:


Special thanks to Janice Lee for the invite to the event. It was a great, inspirational experience!

 

 

How I know more.

Posted on by Nayive Kalkach

Volume 31 - Issue 1 -Winter 2015

Volume 31 - Issue 1 -Winter 2015

Volume 31 - Issue 2 - Spring 2015

Volume 31 - Issue 2 - Spring 2015

I always like to keep up to date in whatever is new in design. Not only on who won the latest competition or what new cool project Interior Design Magazine has but also in the design research matter. It turns out that I am a huge believer in creating a design based on research and educated decisions rather than pure aesthetics which took me to investigate if there were any publications, blogs or websites where I could get this kind of information. Luckily, I found something in the library of my school (who would have thought?) that is very interesting.

 Design Issues "provokes inquiry into the cultural and intellectual issues surrounding design."as their website states. Not only graphic design or industrial design but design as a whole. 

It makes you think in-depth about  design history, human-computer interface, service design, organization design, etc. There are no pictures of pretty furniture or objects (maybe some explanatory charts) but it is full of rich content that could open a nice discussion between you and your designer peers or could be good reference material for you next project.

Forget about the boring 30+ pages studies where you lose track after reading three pages, this academic journal is easy enough to be understood by anybody with interest in the profession and extensive enough to give you insights and a different way of thinking about design. The journal has an online and a physical version. It is published under the MIT Press Journals and comes out quarterly.

Not convinced? Wander in their website , read some of their abstracts and I am sure you will find the same value in it that I did.