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How I know more.

Posted on by Nayive Kalkach

Volume 31 - Issue 1 -Winter 2015

Volume 31 - Issue 1 -Winter 2015

Volume 31 - Issue 2 - Spring 2015

Volume 31 - Issue 2 - Spring 2015

I always like to keep up to date in whatever is new in design. Not only on who won the latest competition or what new cool project Interior Design Magazine has but also in the design research matter. It turns out that I am a huge believer in creating a design based on research and educated decisions rather than pure aesthetics which took me to investigate if there were any publications, blogs or websites where I could get this kind of information. Luckily, I found something in the library of my school (who would have thought?) that is very interesting.

 Design Issues "provokes inquiry into the cultural and intellectual issues surrounding design."as their website states. Not only graphic design or industrial design but design as a whole. 

It makes you think in-depth about  design history, human-computer interface, service design, organization design, etc. There are no pictures of pretty furniture or objects (maybe some explanatory charts) but it is full of rich content that could open a nice discussion between you and your designer peers or could be good reference material for you next project.

Forget about the boring 30+ pages studies where you lose track after reading three pages, this academic journal is easy enough to be understood by anybody with interest in the profession and extensive enough to give you insights and a different way of thinking about design. The journal has an online and a physical version. It is published under the MIT Press Journals and comes out quarterly.

Not convinced? Wander in their website , read some of their abstracts and I am sure you will find the same value in it that I did.   

The mystery of the Cheesecake Factory.

Posted on by Nayive Kalkach

Every time I go to The Cheesecake Factory (Union Square, SF) I get out with a satisfied stomach but with a very unsatisfied eye.

Why is these restaurant so badly designed? I have been trying to figure out what the concept is for a while and fearing that I am the only one that doesn´t like it I asked some of my designer friends. Turns out we share the exact same opinion:  intense yellow and brown placed in every surface and corner, columns with faces on top, bad painted leafs and an extensive combination of textures isn't suitable for a place that claims to have a "warm, comfortable setting".  

Add poor space design ( I counted ten times in five minutes that waiters bumped into each other and into me while waiting for my drink) and a small waiting area  packed with hungry customers and this place becomes a huge mess. Luckily, the food is good enough to keep some people waiting while others (like me) are hoping to get their drinks as fast as possible to get out of that ocean of customers, waiters, food and ugly yellow.

If anybody supports the design decisions behind this restaurant, please let me know. We can have a nice chat.

Oh Yellow. tell us why you are here and why you are so intense. I would expect that since the location is on the top floor of the building, natural light would be greater.

Oh Yellow. tell us why you are here and why you are so intense. I would expect that since the location is on the top floor of the building, natural light would be greater.

As promised, Yellows and Browns with details of leafs  topped with old-looking paint. (I get that the broken paint and finish is on purpose, but why?)

As promised, Yellows and Browns with details of leafs  topped with old-looking paint. (I get that the broken paint and finish is on purpose, but why?)